NEW MUSIC REVIEW:
MARC JOHNSON ‘SWEPT AWAY’ ON ECM
JAZZ TIMES OCTOBER 11, 2012
By Jonathan Sindelman

Not halfway into the first track, Swept Away resonates as a perfectly suitable title for this event, Marc Johnson’s first ECM album since 2005’s Shades of Jade. This time around, he shares the bill with one of today’s truly great pianists, Eliane Elias, a key collaborator for many years, and a musical companion who also happens to be his wife. They’ve been together for 20 years, though Elias expresses the relationship could actually be valued at 85 years when accounting for the amount of time spent working side by side, traveling, and being married. Both individuals exuded greatness from the moment they broke ground on their respective career foundations – Elias with Steps Ahead, and Johnson making history with the Bill Evans trio. What thrives as a vibrant and hedonistic partnership continues to speak volumes about the current project, much of which was conceived in the beauty of their New York home in the Hamptons.

Structured around trio and quartet formats, the program benefits considerably from a chemistry shared between drummer Joey Baron and saxophonist Joe Lovano, as heard on Shades of Jade. Both musicians have history with Johnson dating back over 30 years, and make up a genuine consortium for this affair. The compositions were allowed to fully take on the character of this natural setting, sculpting out of sound an atmosphere that suffuses the ear with a magnified sensitivity and fervor, and remains unencumbered by the contrasting, pristine complexion of the studio walls. Engineer Joe Ferla returns to the fold as well, capturing the ambiance invoked by these sounds, and reveals with stunning clarity the scale and strata of the ensemble’s inner workings.

An abundance of ideas from both Marc and Eliane are in play on this effort, distributed evenly and finding their way onto the page in symbiotic fashion. While Shades of Jade offered an array of palatable arrangements that served as a schematic for inspiring directions in improvisation, Swept Away realizes the ultimate potential of what was initially proposed, shining a collective spotlight on the emotional core that burns inside of every piece. The session is beautifully sequenced, flowing like a series of impressionistic portraits in a gallery, and beckons the listener to intimately study the process in a mode more laissez-faire.

Johnson’s hallmark for expanding the conventional role of accompanist continues to be a virtue, using the physical body and harmonic range of his instrument to illuminate a voice that literally sings through the bass. The rare distinction given to his lyrical approach and interplay with Bill Evans’ piano emerges in a similar vein on the title track, as well as in songs like “Moments” and “Inside Her Old Music Box”, the latter of which features an arco solo that conveys its message poetically just as the composition comes into blossom.

Elias’ breathtaking pianism takes flight on “B is For Butterfly”, inspiring the spirit of Keith Jarrett’s American Quartet with her approach to voicing melodies and gospel-like turnaround phrases. The solo to follow euphemistically echoes the title, and of its own volition crests with soaring momentum, summoning the band to navigate the waves like an Olympic sailing team. The same intensity can be felt on “One Thousand and One Nights”, which by its conclusion becomes a rite of passage that finds the rhythm section bubbling underneath the piano like a newly activated volcano. “Midnight Blue” presents another highlight – An appropriately tinted, blues-tinged theme carried by Lovano’s signature earthy tone, which leisurely caresses each note before finally releasing its passion into the room like sweet incense. Baron’s drums define the space for this tune as he dives off the tallest peak of every melodic phrase, inciting ripples with each punctuation and cymbal splash.

The album is sweetly sealed by Johnson’s arrangement of the traditional folk song, “Shenandoah”, and like a fine digestive, casts a benevolent afterglow around an experience that relentlessly begs repeated listening. Not since Charlie Haden’s Quartet West has there arrived a band that can rouse such imagery and romanticism in the space of a single album, far and away making Swept Away one of 2012’s most essential listens, and a must-see group to catch by the end of this year.

http://jazztimes.com/community/articles/57723-new-music-review-marc-johnson-swept-away-on-ecm


CD review: Marc Johnson/Eliane Elias
Swept Away (ECM 279 4574)
The Jazz Breakfast – 22 September 2012

Double bassist Marc Johnson, from the US’s mid-west, was in Bill Evans last trio; pianist Eliane Elias, from Sao Paulo in Brazil, first came to wide attention in Steps Ahead. They have been a couple for a long time now, and the near-telepathic interchange of the bass and piano throughout this album, their rising and falling at one to heighten the tension of a phrase and then to release it, is a joy to hear.

Just try the opening title track for a taste. It’s a trio track and Joey Baron’s drumming is so subtle it’s like punctuation marks in the poetry.

By track two, It’s Time, the fourth member of the band has added his inimitable voice to these other similarly inimitable ones. The tenor tone is high and metallic, on the very edge of wavering with emotion, keeping it ever so delicately in check like a high-wire artist. Yes, it’s Joe Lovano.

Elias has made some fabulous vocal albums and isn’t shy when it comes to promoting them in full glamour mode. She is also a fabulous pianist, and, while there have always been strong solos on those vocal albums, it’s especially good to hear her in this purely instrumental context, stretching out in such supportive company.

She does a marvellous thing in a solo, keeping the right hand single note runs to a minimum and mixing them in with her own very personal take on the kind of slurred phrasing that characterised ’60s soul-jazz. And on top of that, that Brazilian rhythmic flair means she can really whip up a great groove. On One Thousand And One Nights it has a more North African/Arabic feel, but B Is For Butterfly is where she really shows it off – it’s there in the melody itself, which she composed, and then she builds and builds the swing ever so subtly, until the thing is racing along in ecstatic fashion. Just sensational!

Marc Johnson and Eliane Elias

And Marc Johnson – such a complete bass player, the kind that not only plays beautifully and solos elegantly in his own right but makes everyone else in the band sound even better than they do already. The most intelligently supportive and generous of players. And a beautifully articulated solo on that same B Is For Butterfly is just one example of his improvising.

Baron does his barely there but absolutely crucial trick throughout, and although Lovano not on every track he adds just the right thing when he is.

The compositions, all by Johnson, Elias or the two together, are songlike, lyrical and have a  country serenity to them – they were all written in their home out in the Hamptons in New York State. Johnson’s bluesy Midnight Blue, Elias’s ballad Moments with Lovano particularly lyrical, Johnson’s Eastern-tinged Foujita – there are just too many highlights on this disc. The whole thing is highlights!

It’s also beautifully programmed with the gentle closer a superb solo reading by Johnson of the American folk song Shenandoah.

I have a whole bunch of fine albums in both their names on my shelves, but I think this might just be my favourite. And maybe their finest hour so far.

Swept Away is released in the UK on Monday.

http://thejazzbreakfast.com/2012/09/22/cd-review-marc-johnsoneliane-elias/


Marc Johnson / Eliane Elias: Swept Away (2012)

Published: September 28, 2012
all about jazz

Marc Johnson / Eliane Elias: Swept AwaySwept Away is certainly a collaborative effort—co-led byEliane Elias and bassist Marc Johnson—but it seems more like the pianist’s set. The Sao Paolo-born pianist penned five of the disc’s eleven tunes, and co-wrote two more with her musical/life partner, Johnson. The duo, in league with drummer Joey Baron and, on five tunes, saxophonist Joe Lovano, has produced the most sumptuous music imaginable, beginning with the Elias-penned title tune—a floating trio effort, a sensual haiku to unadorned beauty.

 

Elias’ debt to iconic pianist Bill Evans is obvious in the refined delicacy of her touch. The connection is there: she offered up a stunning tribute to Evans with her 2008 Blue Note Release, Something for You: Eliane Elias Sings and Plays Bill Evans; Johnson was Evans’ bassist in the late 1970s. Evans—perhaps the most influential jazz pianist of the last fifty years—had an approach that was very harmonically sophisticated and highly cerebral. Elias can play from the head, but more often her sound seems to come from the heart.

Lovano comes in on the second tune, “It’s Time,” another Elias original. At this point, very few saxophonists can be considered his equal. Lovano’s rich-toned expressiveness, the elasticity of his lines and his malleable and cliché-free poetics in his play with the melody—matched in the saxophone world only by altoist Lee Konitz—injects a blue hue into Elias’ late night sparkle.

 

If Elias is playing from the heart on the disc’s first two tunes, the music bubbles up from the gut on the danceable, hard-driving “One Thousand and One Nights,” a trio tune where the pianist wears her immense technical proficiency and joy of creation on her sleeve, with Baron adding some pop while Johnson’s bass pushes the sound forward. Johnson’s “When the Sun Comes Up” wanders, via Lovano’s saxophone, into a lazy dawn, picking up momentum as the day brightens and Elias adds a cool flow of angular notes to the bounce of the Johnson/Baron rhythm section.

 

Elias’ “B is for Butterfly,” could serve as a soundtrack to the rising of the monarchs at the beginning of their migration—bright, lighter than air, awe-inspiring in its natural beauty.

 

Swept Away is a magical release, eclipsing even the magnificent Shades of Jade (ECM Records, 2005), which employed the same cast (along with guitarist John Scofield). It’s got everything: Lovano’s jazz Zen; Elias’ romantic enchantment; and Johnson and Baron’s astute and spirited interplay, which binds it all together for one of those rare, near-perfect recordings by a group of veteran artists playing (and writing) at their peak.

http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=42975#.UGhZm47R7EV


Marc Johnson Eliane Elias Swept Away ECM 2012

@CriticalJazz by Brent Black

Swept Away is the appropriately titled new release from Marc Johnson and Eliane Elias which will be available Sept. 25, 2012.

Picking a favorite ECM recording is the sonic equivalent of asking a parent to chose a favorite child, this release would at the very least be in the top five. A stunning display of contemporary aesthetics transformed into a more open ended exploratory of warmth and profound lyrical depth.

Joining Johnson and Elias we have Joey Baron on drums and Joe Lovano on tenor saxophone to round out a fearsome 4tet that brings a unique minimalism of smoldering swing that is captivating to say the least. A subtle yet moving sense of romance combined with an organic swing adds great depth to the chemistry within the ensemble be it in trio or quartet settings. The spatial context of lyrical poetry in motion is a beautiful thing. While ECM has long been noted for their pristine sound quality, the majority of the work was written in the home Johnson and Elias share and it is this transference of comfortable aesthetics that firmly ground Swept Away with that special lyrical sense of purpose.

The title track “Swept Away” is an intimate if not introspective tune from Elias to a more engaging melodic flow of “B is for Butterfly.” One of the more interesting harmonic adventures is the Eastern influenced “One Thousand and One Nights” which contains a unique dynamic tension thanks to the ability of Elias to shift meter on the fly without losing the dramatic effect of the melody. A tune born from a deep and incredibly rich sonic color palette. The Johnson tune “Midnight Blue” may well be the epitome of what “last call” would sound like if set to music. “Midnight Blue” is a perfectly placed tune contributing to the addictive ebb and flow found within Swept Away. Not to be out done, Johnson virtuoso talent shines on an acoustic bass solo of the classic American folk song “Shenandoah” which is a perfect ending to a stellar release. Joe Lovano contributes a deceptively subtle zen like approach throughout the release, less is more and no notes are wasted. Joey Baron plays with the finesse of a highly skilled surgeon adding just the right amount of well placed nuance when required.

An amazing performance from a quartet that easily ranks as one of the best of the last ten years.

http://www.criticaljazz.com/2012/09/marc-johnson-eliane-elias-swept-away.html


The Guardian home The Observer home

Marc Johnson/Eliane Elias: Swept Away – review (ECM)

by Dave Gelly. The Observer, Saturday September 29, 20112

Bassist Marc Johnson and pianist Eliane Elias sound so complete as a duo that you might think even one extra player would be too many. Then, after the first number, in come the discreet Joey Baron on drums and that matchlessly inventive tenor saxophonist Joe Lovano and it all sounds – not better so much as deeper, more resonant. The thing that setsthis apart from the usual quartet or trio set is the extraordinary understanding between Elias and Lovano, whose thoughts seem often to run in parallel. Johnson’s double bass tone is a joy, especially in his solo version of Shenandoah.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2012/sep/30/johnson-elias-swept-away-review?newsfeed=true


Sea Of Tranquility

Sea of Tranquility-The web source for Progressive Rock, Progressive Metal & Jazz-Fusion
Swept Away September 30 2012
Reviewer: Pete Pardo

Swept Away is the title of the new release from the collaboration of double-bassist Marc Johnson and pianist Eliane Elias, but equally important are the contributions of drummer Joey Baron and tenor saxophonist Joe Lovano. All four are veterans of the ECM roster, and working together as a quartet the musicians have delivered some magical sounds on Swept Away.

Most of the songs here just reek of class and majestic-ness thanks to all involved, whether it be the lush opening title track, and sultry “It’s Time”, or the dramatic & engaging “One Thousand and One Nights”. Elias always seems to be at the forefront with her regal melodies, anchored by the elastic grooves and Johnson and Baron’s gentle touch. Lovano’s yearning lines perfectly mimic Johnson’s tender notes on “When the Sun Comes Up”, and the gorgeous “B Is For Butterfly” contains possibly some of the most charming interplay amongst Elias and Johnson on the CD. Other highlights include the smokey jazz of “Midnight Blue”, the more complex “Sirens of Titan” (featuring some great melodies from Lovano), and the exquisite “Inside Her Old Music Box”, an intoxicating number co-written by both Elias & Johnson that features some wonderful plucked & bowed bass work from Johnson. The bassist again wows on the haunting closer “Shenandoah”, delivering some restrained yet highly melodic lead bass lines and chords.

Swept Awaywill indeed leave jazz fans ‘swept away’ by its beauty and class, as these four musicians have put together a highly enjoyable platter of sophisticated and melodic jazz that falls more on the laid back end but satisfies greatly. We can only hope that we’ll hear more from this outfit in the years to come.Added: September 25th 2012
http://www.seaoftranquility.org/reviews.php?op=showcontent&id=13386


Marc Johnson / Eliane Elias: Swept Away (2012)

By JOHN KELMAN,
Published: All About Jazz – September 26, 2012

It’s a relatively rare occasion when Marc Johnson releases an album under his own name, but based on the bassist’s track record—from Bass Desires (ECM, 1985) through to Shades of Jade (ECM, 2005)—it’s always one to celebrate. As Johnson fast approaches 60, it seems like only yesterday that he emerged as the bassist in Bill Evans’ final trio in the late 1970s, before the piano legend’s passing in 1980. But if time has passed, one thing that has remained constant is Johnson’s ability (not unlike Evans) to balance power and elegance, yin and yang. Shades of Jade was, for some, the sleeper hit of 2005 and so it’s great to find Johnson bringing back the core trio and saxophonist Joe Lovano (who also appeared on select tracks), though this time around he acknowledges the greater significance of pianist (and wife) Eliane Elias by putting her name up on the marquee, beside his own.

Elias assumes an even greater role this time around, with five compositional credits to Johnson’s three, alongside two additional tracks co-composed by the couple and one traditional tune. Equally significant is a greater emphasis on Johnson and Elias, with just five tracks fleshed out to a quartet with Lovano, making Swept Away an inevitable successor to Shades while, at the same time, delivering something different. Like Shades, Swept Away takes its time to kick into higher gear, but when it does, the trio delivers on an energy only intimated on the previous recording’s brighter numbers. Elias’ opening title track is a lyrical ballad for the core trio, with Lovano joining for the subsequent “It’s Time,” a smoky, late night tune that capitalizes on the saxophonist’s ability to get deep inside the pianist’s soft yet supple changes, with Johnson and drummer Joey Baron providing similarly pliant but delicate support.

Things change, however, with Elias’ modal “One Thousand and One Nights,” another trio track that ramps up the tempo and the dynamic, with Johnson’s deep, visceral tone and Baron’s more vibrant pulse creating an unshakable foundation for Elias, whose extended solo hints at Middle Eastern tonalities while being equally suggestive of a Midwestern vibe that feels closer to Johnson’s Nebraska roots than it does the pianist’s Brazilian upbringing.

Johnson’s first composition of the date, the indigo-tinged “When the Sun Comes Up,” brings Lovano back, mirroring its title as the bassist slowly moves from dark-hued whole tones to more fervent swing with a stronger, quarter-note pulse. As the quartet picks up steam, Baron manages to combine responsive foil—first to Lovano and then to Elias—with a magical ability to suggest rather than actually play time, aligning with the more anchor-like Johnson.

The co-written tunes range from the gradually building, ultimately effervescent “Sirens of Titan” (another Lovano feature) to the penultimate tone poem, “Inside Her Shoe Box,” featuring Johnson’s evocative arco. Swept Away closes with Johnson delivering an a cappella version of “Shenandoah” that brings the album full circle. It’s a masterful close to a recording that, with its references to both tradition and more spacious, open landscapes, should position Swept Away, like its predecessor, as this year’s sleeper hit.

Track Listing: Swept Away; It’s Time; One Thousand and One Nights; When the Sun Comes Up; B is for Butterfly; Midnight Blue; Moments; Sirens of Titan; Foujita; Inside Her Old Music Box; Shenandoah.

Personnel: Eliane Elias: piano; Marc Johnson: double bass; Joey Baron: drum; Joe Lovano: tenor saxophone.

http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=42979#.UIAtWMxoHvx


Marc Johnson/ ElianeElias: Swept Away

By Mike Hobart
Fianacial Times – October 5, 2012

This beautifully recorded, rich-toned album mingles the bustle of Manhattan with such back-to-nature charms as “B is For Butterfly” and “When the Sun Comes Up”. Pianist Eliane Elias’s confident delivery and light touch are captured at their best, morphing lush impressionism into a late-night blues, adding Eastern-accented inflections to a Latin cruise and delivering a valedictory tribute to the late Michael Brecker – saxophonist Joe Lovano a sensitive guest. Marc Johnson’s resonant, double bass follows each shift and turn, his unaccompanied “Shenandoah” a moving finale.
Marc Johnson/Eliane Elias
Swept Away
(ECM)

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/5a6c568c-0b53-11e2-afb8-00144feabdc0.html#axzz29fiBRfUu


New Music Review: Marc Johnson ‘Swept Away’ on ECM

by Jonathan Sindelman
Seattle Music Insider

Not halfway into the first track, Swept Away resonates as a perfectly suitable title for this event, Marc Johnson’s first ECM album since 2005’s Shades of Jade. This time around, he shares the bill with one of today’s truly great pianists, Eliane Elias, a key collaborator for many years, and a musical companion who also happens to be his wife.  They’ve been together for 20 years, though Elias expresses the relationship could actually be valued at 85 years when accounting for the amount of time spent working side by side, traveling, and being married.  Both individuals exuded greatness from the moment they broke ground on their respective career foundations – Elias with Steps Ahead, and Johnson making history with the Bill Evans trio.  What thrives as a vibrant and hedonistic partnership continues to speak volumes about the current project, much of which was conceived in the beauty of their New York home in the Hamptons.

Structured around trio and quartet formats, the program benefits considerably from a chemistry shared between drummer Joey Baron and saxophonist Joe Lovano, as heard on Shades of Jade. Both musicians have history with Johnson dating back over 30 years, and make up a genuine consortium for this affair.  The compositions were allowed to fully take on the character of this natural setting, sculpting out of sound an atmosphere that suffuses the ear with a magnified sensitivity and fervor, and remains unencumbered by the contrasting, pristine complexion of the studio walls.  Engineer Joe Ferla returns to the fold as well, capturing the ambiance invoked by these sounds, and reveals with stunning clarity the scale and strata of the ensemble’s inner workings.

An abundance of ideas from both Marc and Eliane are in play on this effort, distributed evenly and finding their way onto the page in symbiotic fashion. While Shades of Jade offered an array of palatable arrangements that served as a schematic for inspiring directions in improvisation, Swept Away realizes the ultimate potential of what was initially proposed, shining a collective spotlight on the emotional core that burns inside of every piece.  The session is beautifully sequenced, flowing like a series of impressionistic portraits in a gallery, and beckons the listener to intimately study the process in a mode more laissez-faire.

Johnson’s hallmark for expanding the conventional role of accompanist continues to be a virtue, using the physical body and harmonic range of his instrument to illuminate a voice that literally sings through the bass.  The rare distinction given to his lyrical approach and interplay with Bill Evans’ piano emerges in a similar vein on the title track, as well as in songs like “Moments” and “Inside Her Old Music Box”, the latter of which features an arco solo that conveys its message poetically just as the composition comes into blossom.

Elias’ breathtaking pianism takes flight on “B is For Butterfly”, inspiring the spirit of Keith Jarrett’s American Quartet with her approach to voicing melodies and gospel-like turnaround phrases.  The solo to follow euphemistically echoes the title, and of its own volition crests with soaring momentum, summoning the band to navigate the waves like an Olympic sailing team.  The same intensity can be felt on “One Thousand and One Nights”, which by its conclusion becomes a rite of passage that finds the rhythm section bubbling underneath the piano like a newly activated volcano.  “Midnight Blue” presents another highlight – An appropriately tinted, blues-tinged theme carried by Lovano’s signature earthy tone, which leisurely caresses each note before finally releasing its passion into the room like sweet incense.  Baron’s drums define the space for this tune as he dives off the tallest peak of every melodic phrase, inciting ripples with each punctuation and cymbal splash.

The album is sweetly sealed by Johnson’s arrangement of the traditional folk song, “Shenandoah”, and like a fine digestive, casts a benevolent afterglow around an experience that relentlessly begs repeated listening. Not since Charlie Haden’s Quartet West has there arrived a band that can rouse such imagery and romanticism in the space of a single album, far and away making Swept Away one of 2012’s most essential listens, and a must-see group to catch by the end of this year.

http://seattlemusicinsider.com/?p=10550


AllMusic by Ravi

Swept Away – Eliane Elias – Marc Johnson

No one familiar with the past work of bassist Marc Johnson and pianist Eliane Elias will be surprised to find that this album finds them working in an exploratory mode; Johnson has long been one of the most interesting bassists on the modern jazz scene, and Elias’ résumé is all over the place. But the sweetness, the quiet, and the sometimes deeply haunting melancholy of Swept Away may catch listeners unawares. Elias and Johnson are joined here by the two musicians who are more perfectly suited to this type of project than any others on the scene today: saxophonist Joe Lovano (currently the go-to player for virtually every serious jazz session in New York) and the preternaturally sensitive drummer Joey Baron, a man who has made more session leaders sound wonderful over the past 20 years than any other. Baron and Johnson face a serious challenge on this program: the tempos are generally slow, the sense of swing sometimes nearly subliminal, and that puts bassists and drummers in an awkward position. But on tracks like “It’s Time” and the lovely “B Is for Butterfly,” they keep the thread steady and reliable without dictating a beat or drawing undue attention; when the time comes to lay down a solid groove (as on the wonderful “B Is for Butterfly”), they do so elegantly and seemingly without effort. Swept Away is the best example of what has come to be called “ECM jazz” — quiet, spacious, and friendly, but complex as well and easily able to stand up to close listening.

http://www.allmusic.com/album/swept-away-mw0002409511


Fuse Jazz Review: Eliane Elias/ Marc Johnson – “Swept Away” at Sculler’s

Oct 072012
By Michael Ullman.

In the midst of a typically scintillating, witty set, the multi-talented, Brazilian singer-pianist-composer Eliane Elias turned to chide a customer who was videotaping her. “This is an intimate space,” she said, waving at the stage and in the general direction of bassist Marc Johnson, her partner and accompanist for the past 26 years. (Theirs must be the most celebrated relationship between a singer and bassist since Ella Fitzgerald and Ray Brown.) Intimacy has been the key note of bossa nova performance ever since the initial murmurings of João and Astrud Gilberto, and Elias can whisper with the best of them. She does a lot more. Her voice is poignant, endearing, and sensuous, but she also manages, in songs like João Donato’s “A Rã” (The Frog) to convey humor, even irony. Her piano playing can be powerful: not for nothing has she dedicated a piece, “Bowing to Bud,” to the rattlingly percussive bebop pianist Bud Powell.

Elias was discovered, she told us, by Antonio Carlos Jobim and his lyricist Vinicius De Moraes, when she was playing piano at a club. She was 17. She must have been a prodigy. The pair took her on tour where, she said, she learned bossa nova from the source, or sources. With pieces by Gilberto Gil, Donato, and, of course, Jobim, her initial Scullers set showed her roots, and also her character. She introduced “Chega de Saudade” without piano: the sound seemed to lack nothing, and yet the beginning of her ensuing piano solo seemed to start the dance all over again and with more intensity. She paces each solo, ending sometime with intense, two-fisted phrases that recall McCoy Tyner more than Bud Powell. She began “Só Danço Samba” with a long, bluesy piano introduction that, she acknowledged, shows the debt Brazilians owed to American jazz.

To further demonstrate that link, she sang a song that suggests the connection: by Gilberto Gil, it translates as something like “Chewing Gum” and “Eating Bananas.” In every set I have seen by Elias, she has performed an American classic: here it was “They Can’t Take That Away From Me.” Somehow she made Gershwin bounce like a bossa nova. She continued by telling the story of “Rosa Morena,” a song about a shy girl who gets up to dance and gradually finds (or loses) herself in the dance. Elias danced the song to demonstrate.

http://artsfuse.org/70433/fuse-jazz-review-eliane-elias-marc-johnson-live-at-scullers/


Marc Johnson/ Eliane Elias

Irish Times
Thursday, October 18, 2012

It’s seven years since bassist Marc Johnson recorded the much-admired Shades of Jade with Brazilian pianist Eliane Elias – his life partner as well as his longtime musical collaborator. If anything, they have bettered it here.

The group again features saxophonist Joe Lovano and drummer Joey Baron, two of the most sensitive musicians in US jazz, and the chemistry within this quartet of equals is palpable.

But it is the superb Elias who really lifts Swept Away to another level. There are echoes of Keith Jarrett’s European quartet, notably on One Thousand and One Nights, with its funky bass line and gospel harmonies, and the ghost of Bill Evans (Johnson’s former employer) hangs over the harmony, but this is a group with its own very authentic sound and, in Lovano and Elias, two soloists who can gently pull a tune apart and put it back together in many different, beautiful forms. ecmrecords. com

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/theticket/2012/1012/1224325168629.html